Simply put, engagement is the ability to hold a user’s attention. In SEO terms, it is a measure of the amount of time spent on a page. Although Google hasn’t officially declared it, there is evidence to suggest that this search engine giant does reward sites with strong user engagement with higher page ranking. Offsite references, reviews, and social links play a role in how your content performs on search engines. Inbound links to your site are still important, and so is a logical sitemap with internal linking among pages. Another quick and easy strategy for hunting down long tail keywords again starts by searching one of your regular short, generic keywords. At the end of the search results page should be a list of related searches. These again can be used as long tail keywords themselves or used as suggestions for finding others. Another valuable way to improve your domain authority is by getting other people to link to your website and your content. That takes time, some strategic networking, and a little ingenuity.

Passing PageRank

The Google-led open source project AMP, or Accelerated Mobile Pages, has one goal: loading your pages as fast as possible Google uses your meta data to interpret what your website is about and ranks the pages accordingly. While it is important to have your keywords within the meta data, it can be overdone and hinder the user experience, actually deterring people away from a page rather than enticing. This happens when your meta title and description is written for Google’s search bots rather than as a description for real people. SEO can be difficult to understand and due to its ever changing nature, it can feel like a chore to keep up. The number and quality of links pointing to your site will largely determine in what position your site ranks.

It’s time to revolutionize our approach to keyword generation

The easiest way to build high quality links are what SEOs call “web 2.0s.” That’s just a way to say “social sites” or sites that let you post stuff. Now tweeting a link into the abyss won’t do you anything, but profiles, status pages, etc. do carry some weight. And if they come from a popular domain that counts as a link. SEO has matured. It is a serious business, and most brands invest a lot of time and effort into it. Today, semantic search has evolved even more, and search engines are better than ever at understanding query context and the relationships between words. Mobile sites not only use a different format from normal desktop sites, but the management methods and expertise required are also quite different. This results in a variety of new challenges. While many mobile sites were designed with mobile viewing in mind, they weren’t designed to be search friendly.

Paid links have got smacked down even more by Google

Don’t let ego fuel your obsession with keyword rankings. And remember that your personal search experience is not necessarily what your prospective customers see. If your site is new and is in a competitive niche with high DR scores, then your initial plan should be to build links directly to pages you want to rank. Do you have enough pages around a specific topic area that it would make sense to create a page describing these related pages (e.g. root page -> related topic listing -> specific topic)? Do you have hundreds of different products that need to be classified under multiple category and subcategory pages? We asked an SEO Specialist, Gaz Hall, for his thoughts on the matter: "A headline is usually the first thing we notice when accessing a search engine, and this reminds us that a headline should be: valuable, relevant, simple and appealing."

Understanding Your Audience and Finding Your Niche

You may not have the resources to create locale sites for each country or language you want to target. In that case, add Google Translate to your site to ensure that your website visitors can see your content in their language (even if it’s not a perfect translation). Limit each paragraph to 2-3 sentences at most. It’s even okay to use one-sentence paragraphs if necessary, but use them sparingly or your post will look like a bullet-pointed blog without the bullets. The reason that most SEOs don’t know technical SEO is because they don’t spend enough time meeting and talking to web developers. SEO is very simple, and unless you’re a very large company it’s probably not worth hiring somebody else to do.