Different search queries with different intent will result in different results. Google has become so sophisticated that when a web user searches for a “How to find organic foods” he or she will get a different results page than if he or she typed in the search query “where is the closest grocery store.” The intent behind both searches are different and Google knows it. Google now supports using the rel=“canonical” link element across different domains. This means that you can have similar content on both the .com and .co.uk extensions of your site, and use the canonical link element to indicate the exact URL of the domain preferred for indexing. This will make duplicate content a non-issue. Also, keep in mind that this is not required when using different languages. Google does not consider foreign-language translations to be duplicate content. But it is something to consider for multiple locale sites in the same language. SEO can be difficult to understand and due to its ever changing nature, it can feel like a chore to keep up. 95% of the U.S. Internet browsing population accesses search engines each month. Furthermore, the U.S. online population makes an average of 37 search engine visits per person per month.

What effect does SEO have?

Even the intent of someone searching the web on a mobile device is different from someone using a computer. The content must not only be shorter and more concise but it also must have a different message to cater to the different consumer intent. The search engines attempt to measure the quality and uniqueness of a website’s content. One method they may use for doing this is evaluating the document itself. Prioritise content marketing. That's publishing valuable content on your website. These can be articles, blogs, white papers, videos, infographics or other interesting information that can be shared with your network via an e-newsletter or social media. Doing this will create backlinks naturally. Visual content is more important than ever. It manages to supplement text in the best possible way (or even to replace it) and it certainly can affect SEO.

Why Relevancy Matters in Building Real Links

Even if the social search playing field hasn’t been completely defined yet, one of the key takeaways from the early actions of Google, Bing, and Facebook is that as marketers, we need to start seeing our search engine optimization strategy and our social media strategy as utterly intertwined. Some SEO professionals have been predicting the demise of links for a several years. But there’s little evidence to support this trend so far. Focus on your customers, and take the right logistical steps to make sure that search engines can find your content. Focus on the ‘road less traveled’ with long-tail opportunities, and you’ll be set. A lot of marketers focus on social in their online marketing strategy. But, it’s important to use both online search and social. Search is more powerful than social and more effective when supported by social.

On the web, our audience is global

A cornerstone of effective SEO is producing quality content, and understandably, that can be difficult for marketers or business owners busy with other things. We know consumers want personal interactions with brands, but they also want them in real time I highly recommend starting off with building out resources their target audience would care about, want to share on social media, and want to link to. Gaz Hall, an SEO Expert from the UK, said: "The age of backlinks matter. Links that have existed for a long time weigh more heavily in your website’s link graph."

Get inside the heads of your customers

The best way to get backlinks from other blogs and from social media sites is to write posts that are engaging and worth sharing. The content on your website must be unique and creative. It has to be relevant to your readers, and not published just for SEO purposes. To create relevant content, research the latest trends and write blog posts that are engaging. Teach your audience how to do something, and always update old content. Google only show sitelinks for results when they think they’ll be useful to the user. If the structure of your site doesn’t allow Google's algorithms to find good sitelinks, or they don’t think that the sitelinks for your site are relevant for the user’s query, Google won’t show them. Clearly, keywords are important. They always have been and they always will be. Search engines like Google want to know that a piece of content is obviously about a specific keyword.