By regularly auditing your – or your client’s – sites, you can get a good feel for what you still need to do to improve SEO. Instead of willy-nilly linking to pages from site-wide elements, like the top navigation or the footer, consider the value of the pages that you intend to throw in the navigation. Try to limit your sitewide links to only the 20 percent of your pages that are the most valuable, and pages required for a good user experience. When working on your content, you should take the next biggest thing into account: voice search. Yes, it’s been around for a while. But with the advent of Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s nameless Home assistant, things are moving fast right now. Technical SEO is work improving the non-content parts of your website. These tend to be the elements behind the scenes that visitors don’t see (but often affect their experience of the website!)

How the Google Hummingbird Update Changed Search

Think of the last time you wanted to purchase a product but knew next to nothing about it. What did you do? You likely used a search engine to look for online reviews or articles about the product. If the most helpful article was on a site that also sold the product, odds are that you purchased at that site. Google wants to see that people are spending time on your website and the best way you can ensure this happens is by making content that people want to read. Moreover, you need to ensure that that content is presented in a way that encourages people to stick around. A Google study showed that more than 80% of users search stores and local service providers online before visiting them. This fact makes it important to optimize your website for the local search. The online visit is a basis for more customers and more sales. You should always Google keywords before committing to them.because it’ll help you to understand what—in Google’s eyes—is the best result for that particular keyword. If most of the results are vastly different to the content you’re trying to rank, it probably isn’t a great keyword to target.

Paying people to link to your site won’t pay off in the long run

No matter what niche your website is in, when you start writing an article, always provide helpful and actionable guidance. If you are giving the users the information they want, your content can be as long as you need. Write great title tags. Good title tags should be like an interesting newspaper headline but with relevant keywords included. You can signal relevancy of your content to search engines by using keywords for your image file name, alt tag, title, description and caption. Good formatting can instantly improve your page’s readability. This, in turn, can improve your engagement rate.

SEO is the tool to drive people to your website

One of the most common problems that I hear from people looking to learn more about SEO is that they don't know what information to trust. Site speed is an essential element of any campaign and for good reasons. You’ve also got to prioritize index and site structure when reviewing your technical SEO – obvious choices but absolutely paramount. Using different tags and elements on your page will help search engines understand which parts of the content are connected to each other, and which are separate. Gaz Hall, from SEO Hull, had the following to say: " Do you have enough pages around a specific topic area that it would make sense to create a page describing these related pages (e.g. root page -> related topic listing -> specific topic)? Do you have hundreds of different products that need to be classified under multiple category and subcategory pages?"

Focus on what you do best

Google only show sitelinks for results when they think they’ll be useful to the user. If the structure of your site doesn’t allow Google's algorithms to find good sitelinks, or they don’t think that the sitelinks for your site are relevant for the user’s query, Google won’t show them. Contrary to popular belief, social media doesn't have a direct relationship with your search rankings. However, it can have an indirect bearing on the success of your SEO campaign. It’s not just about creating quality content, but also about knowing your audience, to the extent that the content is useful and has more chances to be ranked higher in the search results for the relevant queries. An infinite number of niches are waiting for someone to claim them. I’d ask yourself where you want to be, and see if you can find a path from a tiny specific niche to a slightly bigger niche and so on, all the way to your desired goal. Sometimes it’s easier to take a series of smaller steps instead of jumping to your final goal in one leap.